Download the minube app
and travel like never before
Download
Where'd you like to go?
Do you like Carmona?
Share it with the world!
Enter with Google +

Things to do in Carmona

144 contributors
Historical Monuments in Carmona
Alcázar Puerta de Sevilla
(6)
Historical Monuments in Carmona
Roman Necropolis
(2)
Historical Monuments in Carmona
Roman Amphitheatre
Historical Monuments in Carmona
(1)
Historical Monuments in Carmona
(2)
Historical Monuments in Carmona
(1)
Historical Monuments in Carmona
(1)
Historical Monuments in Carmona
Churches in Carmona
St. Peter's Church
(1)
Churches in Carmona
San Francisco Chapel
(1)
Churches in Carmona
Churches in Carmona
Church of San Felipe
Churches in Carmona
(1)
Churches in Carmona
(2)
Churches in Carmona
(1)
Churches in Carmona
Churches in Carmona
Churches in Carmona
Churches in Carmona
Churches in Carmona
Churches in Carmona
(1)
Churches in Carmona
Churches in Carmona

The top 72 attractions in Carmona

Villages in Carmona
Carmona
(12)
Carmona is a city with much history. There are many artifacts from different periods of history. In one part of the city there are many graves of different people and animals. In the Elephant Tomb archaeologists found a sculpture of a small elephant. In the museum there are many other sculptures like the sculpture Servilia Infante. Servilia's sculpture is a woman without a head. There is another tomb is called the Tomb of Servilia, it is very large and contains many parts and quarters. It also has a mural and was used by the rich for burial. The Tomb of the Two Families was for poorer families because it is smaller than the Tomb of Servilia. The city of Carmona has many artifacts, cathedrals, buildings and other things. Many people of different ages live in the city. These people were Roman, Islamic, Baroque and modern people. There is a building called the Puerta de Sevilla that many people of different ages built. You can see the time differences in the architecture and materials used. Finally, Carmona is a beautiful city rich in history.
Historical Monuments in Carmona
Alcázar Puerta de Sevilla
(6)
My Spanish class went to a town near Seville last Thursday. We took a bus together and arrived early in the morning. We walked through many parts of the town. The best picture of this trip was a photo I took on the roof of Alcázar de la Puerta de Sevilla. I took many photos as the view from the roof was staggering. In the background of the picture there are lots of white houses. White buildings look very fresh and clean. White houses are very common in Andalusia because the region has many extremely hot days and lots of towns in Andalusia have the nickname "white villages". The building in the center of the photo is a large church with a high tower. This church called San Bartolomé and is Gothic-Mudejar style. Many of the buildings in Carmona are Moorish-style because Carmona is a very old city.
Historical Monuments in Carmona
Roman Necropolis
(2)
Just outside Carmona you should not overlook the Roman necropolis, which includes two large mausoleums: the Tomb the Elephant and the Servilia Tomb, the latter has the appearance of a Roman villa. In the same cemetery there is a museum with many pieces discovered in the tombs. Be sure to stroll through Carmona and get the most out of the "tapas route" in the old town.
Churches in Carmona
St. Peter's Church
(1)
This is the most important church in Carmona and it is located off the main entrance to the old town - Puerta de Sevilla. It was built at the end of the fourteenth century on the site of the Virgen de la Antigua shrine, by order of Henry II who had besieged the city. The besieging Catholic Monarchs ordered an expansion of the hermitage and later, in the eighteenth century, it adopted baroque forms. Initially it was a single nave with a gabled Arab roof and a number of outbuildings. In the late eighteenth century it was made into a bell tower, this was a local decision because of the appearance of the Giralda in Seville, and is known as La Giraldilla. The highlights inside are the presbytery dome, the tabernacle churrigueresco and its entire imagination.
Churches in Carmona
San Francisco Chapel
(1)
Walking along this street Carmones you will find a corner to enjoy an afternoon walk. I've been talking with John and he also agrees with me and that also seems excessive to have to write a book just to post something.
Churches in Carmona
Squares in Carmona
Palaces in Carmona
Aguilar Family House-Palace
It is the most original of the Convention Carmona Houses. Its characteristics were chosen to host the local Consistory for centuries and until 1842 it was adapted to host the Jesuit convent located downtown. Built in 1697 for the noble residence. The Aguilar economic importance is reflected by the additions and embellishments of the same facade. The decorative motif of acanthus leaves is a symbol used on the facades to indicate the economic power of the owners. Pyramidal auctions are also used for the same purpose. Otherwise its construction is similar to the rest of the baroque palaces in the town. Its decoration is concentrated into two bodies. The lower lintel is located between columns where Mudejar Ionic pilasters and original feature have been placed. The upper balcony is a low pediment with coat of arms, which is framed between pyramidal finials. The interior echoes the baroque typology with a central courtyard around which two floors are articulated with arcades.
Historical Monuments in Carmona
Roman Amphitheatre
Carmona Roman Amphitheatre dates back to the 1st century BC. It was privately owned until the year 1973 when the Counts of Water wheel donated it to the state, but it was largely abandoned. The excavation works were those of Jorge Bonsor, and in 1the year 885. It is on the same street of the necropolis, resulting in an interesting contrast... how close the cemetery and sand are together. Parking is easy, because along the avenue there is room to spare. For reference remember that it iss at the eastern entrance of the village of Carmona, Seville address, but outside the walls. The amphitheater is not visitable. It can be seen through the mesh surrounding it, but you can not approach it. Most of the amphitheater remains still underground. Over the centuries the amphitheater has been silting of land and is surrounded by a series of buildings that hinder the power out to light. But this does not seem so complicated, because worse is the amphitheater located in Cadiz and is almost completely excavated. In this anfitetrao barely visible the existence of underground galleries on one side and most of the stands remain buried. Roughly one can get an idea of ​​how Carmo was the amphitheater, but little else. The best view of the assembly can be obtained from the terrace of the Interpretation Centre of the Necropolis, free access.
Streets in Carmona
(4)
Historical Monuments in Carmona
(1)
Squares in Carmona
(2)
Of Cultural Interest in Carmona
El Carmonilla
In the northern part of Carmona, beyond where the Cardus Maximus Roman road is extended, there is a small square with a modern air where you will find one of the most popular local histories. Near the halt of Guadajoz a roundabout has been reused to install a reproduction of the train that carried out the route between Guadajoz and Carmona. The railway was authorized in 1875 and, as in other similar ways, this type of train moved there due to the strength of the coal. The purpose for this line was for the nearby mines to be linked from the north of the province and framed within the industrial plans of the industrial revolutions. Until the failure of the model based on coal yield end to this type of trains miners and became part of the past. These trains were known by the nickname of cinders, due to the fact that the smoke that they used to give off would smudge, and therefore it would look like ashes. The cinders of Carmona was soon renamed by the as Carmonilla and said it was not racist because he rode a white and black was down. The little train on exhibition there is not real, though. This is a reproduction, made by Carmona IV Workshop School in December 2004.
Of Cultural Interest in Carmona
House of the Waters
It is a civilian building that until the last century supplied drinking water to the people of Carmona. It is in the highest part of the town, very close to the Puerta de Córdoba and opposite the church of Santiago. It's being renovated due to its current cultural importance and is remarkable for its Mudejar building aesthetics. It's a 2-floor brick building. At the entrance, there is Baroque ornamentation that clashes with the rest of it. There is a lintel entrance between flat pilasters and upper balcony with a small overhang. The building has three floors, topped by an undeniably Andalus gallery with semicircular arch. Inside, there's a large space, ideal for all kinds of exhibitions and cultural events, as well as various agencies related to its previous function as a water supply.
Churches in Carmona
Church of San Felipe
This is the original religious building across all Carmona, in the Renaissance Mudejar style. Clearly. This church was a mosque, which is proved by the existence of its minaret, which frames the entry arch panels and basilica. In 1247 when Carmona was conquered by Christian armies mosques were converted into Catholic churches. Thus San Felipe was the saint whose name was given of this mosque in the high Muslim Medina neighborhood. Curiously the church took the form of a tower facade, which is very scarce in Andalusia. The minaret was extended and the entrance to it, after a courtyard, became the main facade of the temple maintaining its Mudejar structure. Slowly throughout the eighteenth century various elements and styles were introduced in the Church. Such as an eighteenth-century altar and a clear Mudejar style coffered ceiling. The church has a basilica and three naves separated by columns. To reach San Felipe enter the walled city through the Puerta de Sevilla and the Plaza del Palenque, then take the street on the right. San Felipe's image can be seen from the Puerta de Sevilla. Park as soon as possible as it is very difficult to find a place in front of San Felipe.
Of Cultural Interest in Carmona
Urban Wall of Carmona
(1)
The walled city of Carmona stands over 3 km, which is a sign of its significance in Roman Andalusia. It was walled in the 8th century BC until conquered by the Bárquidas that extended the walls based on square and rectangular towers. The moat can be seen at the entrance gate of the Alcazar of Seville. When the city was taken by the Romans, they changed the wall. Rome drew the urban fabric of Carmona following its usual typology: An open forum in the center and 4 gates at the cardinal points of the walls together by 2 main routes. The decumanus maximus was oriented east-west coming together in Carmona doors Cordoba and Seville. The Cardus maximus was oriented north-south connecting the gates of Lora del Rio and Marchena, now demolished. In the thirteenth century the Almohads modified Roman plotting barbicans including some towers and arches. In the 18th century the Renaissance and Baroque Córdoba Gate retouched. The two most important elements of the wall of Carmona are the palaces of their front doors. The top hosts a National Parador, the lower the Office of Tourism. Both palaces are visited. I recommend taking a look.
Markets in Carmona
(1)
Of Touristic Interest in Carmona